Capital Projects Department Changes

City Hall announced yesterday that Edward Nuzzo, Somerville’s superintendent of inspectional services, would transfer to his former position as capital projects manager. Nuzzo had previously held the position from 1998 until 2010 before becoming the head of ISD.

The capital projects department was re-instated in the city budget in fiscal year 2013 after being eliminated in fiscal year 2011.

Nuzzo will earn $80,000 annually, a raise from his previous salary of $67,200.

In June, Scout reported that Nuzzo had been unable to pass state-mandated tests required to hold the ISD position — something his predecessor, George Landers, had also failed to achieve prior to being transferred from the position.

From the report:

Nuzzo’s struggle speaks to a central issue with ISD that was ignored in the independent review: Somerville has had nearly constant certification issues with its superintendent since Mayor Joseph Curtatone took office in 2004.

In prepared statements, both Nuzzo and Mayor Joseph Curtatone indicated that Nuzzo asked for the transfer.

“I have enjoyed my time as ISD Superintendent, but when the City reestablished its capital projects management function as an in-house operation, I knew I wanted to return to a job that’s given me a lot of satisfaction over the years,” Nuzzo said.

Said Curtatone: “I know he enjoyed his prior career as a capital projects manager and clerk of the works for some very high-profile City projects, and I am not surprised that he wants to get back to focusing on direct, day-to-day  project supervision.  Eddie has been a star and a great team player in all of the roles he has played for the City, and we’re happy to support him in his desire to transfer back to a career that he finds more congenial and, frankly, that offers better pay.”

Nuzzo will continue to act as the head of ISD until a new hire is approved.

UPDATE: 12:52 p.m.

City spokesman Tom Champion confirmed it was Nuzzo’s decision in an email this afternoon:

Eddie saw the opportunity to return to a career he loved – and one that pays better than IS Superintendent.  That’s his choice, not a City maneuver.  The certification  issue is moot.

Comments